Windows XP, Trick or Treat?

Windows XP End of Life Discussion

Here is a case study: a client was able to redirect what was being spend in monthly IT maintenance of an in-house server based network, move to the cloud, set-up use with mobile devices, and create a custom portal to save time and cost to bring in more Clients. The portal is so successful that it has actually opened new lines of business.

Today I’m writing about something that sounds kind of ghoulish. I was told by a Client a few months ago, “Matt, end of life sounds gross. Like something died.” After few more months I got another email, “Matt I’m reading about security vulnerabilities due to Windows XP. Are we still using Windows XP?” I was able to reply , that they had long since moved from Windows XP to Windows 7.

You’re probably wondering why I am taking the time to be concerned with Operating System issues as a Media and Marketing consultant? The answer is that today, media and marketing is all about technology.

Get in touch with me at (201) 289-2762 or send me a private email to my personal email address maginleym@gmail.com, and we can have a brief consultation, and answer a few questions for you about how this situation with XP can be a growth opportunity for your business.

Respectfully,

Matt Maginley

NOTES:

On APRIL 8, 2014 Microsoft support for Windows XP ended and it was estimated that  60% of those companies still using Windows XP were not prepared for Microsoft dropping security updates.

What does ‘End of Support’ Mean? An unsupported version of Windows will no longer receive software updates from Windows Update. These include security updates that can help protect your PC from harmful viruses, spyware, and other malicious software, which can steal your personal information. Windows Update also installs the latest software updates to improve the reliability of Windows—new drivers for your hardware and more.

What are the risks that businesses face by staying on Windows XP? Since there will be no scheduled security patches after next April, companies continuing to run Windows XP face the risk of targeted hacking attacks. SMBs are often targeted because they lack sufficient protection, and cybercriminals sometimes use them as a stepping stone to larger targets. 2012 saw a 30 percent increase in web-based attacks, and it’s possible many of these used the compromised website of a small business to attack a larger organization (Symantec study, 2012). Are there hidden costs to staying on Windows XP after the end of support date? Yes, staying on Windows XP after the end of support date means paying for:

  • Virtualizing the entire OS to remain compliant with the Microsoft end user license agreement (EULA) (only valid while there’s Server 2003 support available)
  • Running XP in a sandboxed environment
  • Mobile Device Management
  • Increased IT Support